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artlog:

Art and Fear:You Should Go To Alcatraz…

… and say hello to Ai Weiwei
I generally feel some skepticism when I hear of an exhibit by a famous artist.  Maybe there is a pretentious air, an exclusive nature, or some other form of “look at me” being made acceptable through the purchase of a ticket.  But I don’t feel this way with Ai Weiwei.

While I might put him on a small pedestal, I don’t think it is an excessive one.  It is the same one on which I place other well known political activist, only it is slightly heightened by his title of artist.  
Personally, as a young artist I find it difficult to make work.  I find it even more difficult to make meaningful work.  And I find that the words from the book Art and Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking, "artists don’t get down to work until the pain of working is exceeded by the pain on not working”, to be very true.
This is why I love Ai Weiwei.  Because even strapped down by the enormous weight of his situation, he makes work.  And he makes meaningful work.  
This year in Brooklyn, at According to What he showed me many things, and then gave me their memory by letting me lean over an exhibit and smell one ton of tea.  He let me experience a small version of his world.

On view are seven separate projects; With Wind, Trace, Refraction, Stay Tuned, Illumination, Blossom, Yours Truly.
So, in other words… Go visit Ai in Alcatraz, and see what he has to say.
@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz is open now until April 26, 2015. Click HERE for more info.
-Becca Gore
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
2500
Aperture
f/4
Exposure
1/50th
Focal Length
24mm

artlog:

Art and Fear:You Should Go To Alcatraz…

… and say hello to Ai Weiwei

I generally feel some skepticism when I hear of an exhibit by a famous artist.  Maybe there is a pretentious air, an exclusive nature, or some other form of “look at me” being made acceptable through the purchase of a ticket.  But I don’t feel this way with Ai Weiwei.

While I might put him on a small pedestal, I don’t think it is an excessive one.  It is the same one on which I place other well known political activist, only it is slightly heightened by his title of artist.  

Personally, as a young artist I find it difficult to make work.  I find it even more difficult to make meaningful work.  And I find that the words from the book Art and Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking"artists don’t get down to work until the pain of working is exceeded by the pain on not working”, to be very true.

This is why I love Ai Weiwei.  Because even strapped down by the enormous weight of his situation, he makes work.  And he makes meaningful work.  

This year in Brooklyn, at According to What he showed me many things, and then gave me their memory by letting me lean over an exhibit and smell one ton of tea.  He let me experience a small version of his world.

On view are seven separate projects; With Wind, Trace, Refraction, Stay Tuned, Illumination, Blossom, Yours Truly.

So, in other words… Go visit Ai in Alcatraz, and see what he has to say.

@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz is open now until April 26, 2015. Click HERE for more info.

-Becca Gore

ancientpeoples:

Earring in the form of a 3 lobed wineskin 

2nd-1st Century BC

Parthian, Mesopotamia

Interaction between Mesopotamia and the Greco-Roman world—initiated by the conquests of Alexander the Great, continuing with the influx of Greek merchants and settlers in the Seleucid period and Roman settlements in the area during the Parthian period—had a considerable impact on the style, subject matter, and technique of Mesopotamian art of the first millennium A.D.

This exquisitely crafted earring consists of an Eros-like, winged male youth with long curly hair partly drawn up in a topknot above his forehead. His hands are on his hips and one wing is folded back while the second is missing. There is a suspension loop on his lower body from which hangs a three-lobed wineskin covered with granulation (minute granules of gold attached to the surface). The combination in this earring of Eros, a Greek deity, and the wineskin, a Near Eastern motif that became associated with the worship of Dionysos, shows the seemingly eclectic borrowing from Greek culture that often characterizes the art of the Near East in this period.

The style and subject matter date this earring to the Parthian period, and its provenance suggests that it was originally from Mesopotamia. The calling card of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hope accompanied the earring into the Museum’s collection, and on the back are notes detailing the history of ownership, stating that it was found by British archaeologist Austen Henry Layard, excavator of Nimrud and Nineveh, around 1845.

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

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